Watchworthy Wednesday: Opportunity to Provide Computer Ed in K-12 Schools


Want to provide a computer science and computational thinking education project in K-12 schools? Teams of educators, researchers, community members and others interested in doing so are being offered the chance to be awarded 19 “CS for All” grants, totaling $20 million, from the National Science Foundation (NSF). “With this solicitation, the NSF focuses on researcher-practitioner partnerships (RPPs) that foster the research and development needed to bring CS/CT to all schools,” says Nichole D. Pinkard, founder of the Digital Youth Network and associate professor in the School of Design College of Computing and Digital Media at

What World of Warcraft Teaches About Misinformation


A recent study from Stanford University cited that 82 percent of middle schoolers can’t distinguish between an ad labeled “sponsored news” and a real news story. The authors of the study cited that students need to be better trained in information literacy and use better information seeking strategies to solve this problem. This is a reasonable strategy but runs into issues with implementation. Teaching information literacy, the process of determining the quality and source of information, has been an emphasis of the American Association of School Librarians for decades. However, teaching of information literacy in school has declined as

Watchworthy Wednesday: CLA Debuts Newsletter


The Connected Learning Alliance has debuted a weekly e-mail newsletter, featuring updates from the blog of the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub and the greater CLA and DML community. Its mission is simple: to keep you informed about the latest news, opportunities and opinion from researchers, educators and innovators who are part of the movement for connected learning. Connected learning is learning that is social, powered by interests, and connected to opportunity, explains Mimi Ito, CLA co-founder. “The connected in connected learning is about putting people and equity first as technology becomes more prevalent in the lives of young

How Well are we Preparing Students for the Future of Work?


As a former history teacher, it makes me laugh and cry that so many prominent figures in education (especially education technology) have such a poor understanding of the history of their subject. Many, for example, assume that the school summer vacation was due to children helping get the crops in. Not so. Similarly, the factory origin myth of compulsory education is almost entirely made-up. We’re fond of post hoc explanations that allow us to quickly get onto the point we really want to make. If we sidestep Ivan Illich’s (fairly compelling) arguments that we should be

The DigitalLearningification of Museums


This past October, I had the pleasure of presenting in Irvine, California at the new home for the Digital Media and Learning Conference on digital learning at museums. With my colleagues Eve Gaus of The Field Museum and Rik Panganiban of the California Academy of Sciences, we tried to identify the leading trends we’ve seen emerging in recent years, given our different vantage points as advocates for digital learning in our respective museums. Playfully titled “The DigitalLearningification of Informal Learning Centers: Lessons from Three Museums,” we tried to make the case that museums are unique and

Watchworthy Wednesday: Survey Analyzes Plugged-in Parents


While 8- to 18-year-olds are clocking in lots of screen time, their parents are doing the same if not more, according to a new survey, measuring parental media use. The study by Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization that provides parents, educators and youth with information to help with navigating media and technology, found that parents of teens and tweens spend more than nine hours a day looking at their screens. Of those parents surveyed, 78 percent believe they are good media and technology role models for their children. “The great news is that the report shows