Aleks Krotoski

Aleks Krotoski headshot

Aleks is an academic and journalist who writes about and studies technology and interactivity. Her PhD thesis in Social Psychology (University of Surrey, 2009) examined how information spreads around the social networks of the World Wide Web. She is a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute and the Researcher-in-Residence for the British Library’s Growing Knowledge exhibition.

 

Read up on her academic and research activities and interests here. She completed the 4-part, prime time BBC 2 series Virtual Revolution in early 2010, about the social history of the World Wide Web. She blogged for the project here, outlining her manifestos about the social, political, economic and psychological impact of the 20 years of the Web. Aleks writes for The Guardian and Observer newspapers, and hosts Tech Weekly, their technology podcast. Her writing also appears in Nature, BBC Technology, New Statesman, MIT Technology Review and The Telegraph. Check out her words here. Finally, she’s the New Media Sector Champion for UKTI, the government department that promotes British businesses around the world. Find out more here. You can find Aleks all over the Web.


Blogs (5)


Interview: T. Mills Kelly on ‘Lying About the Past’ and Media Literacy

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

article story who killed alice walsh in old newspaper clipping Professor T. Mills Kelly is a historian at George Mason University in Washington, D.C. In 2012, he and students of his course, ‘Lying About the Past‘, became headline news after it was uncovered that they had created “false facts” about fictional events and posted them online in blogs, videos and Wikipedia entries. Professor Kelly believes this method of working-through is true to the learning objectives of the course and, moreover, that it is the best way to instill a deep understanding of practical ethics. Yet he was lambasted for unethical use of the Internet by fellow


‘The Virtual Revolution’: Argentina

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

group of people watching computer slideshow in conference room I recently returned to the UK from a trip to Argentina. I had been invited to speak about The Virtual Revolution, the television series I presented for BBC2 2010 by the OSDE Foundation, the community arm of the country’s largest health care provider. While there, I had the opportunity to learn a bit more about the country and what is motivating their technology industry. Like many around the world, the Argentinian government wants to increase their blanket of access. They currently boast a not insubstantial 54% internet access rate — an impressive figure given the size


Reflexivity: Why We Must Choose to Shape, and Not Be Shaped By, Technology

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

women sitting in the dark working on laptop In her new book, Consent of the Networked, Rebecca Mackinnon offers a reality check: “We have a problem,” she writes. “We understand how power works in the physical world, but we do not yet have a clear understanding of how power works in the digital realm.” In fact, we probably don’t even think about power when we update our statuses on Twitter, connect with old school friends and upload pictures on Facebook, buy a book based on a recommendation from Amazon or use Mail, Docs, Plus, Maps or search on Google. Software — from computer games


Internet Research & Ethics: The Case of the London Riots Analysis

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

lego pieces characters sitting at lego computers one being arrested by police In the summer of 2011, London erupted in flames. Now, it’s not the first time the city has burned; it’s had a rich history of conflagration within its walls and revolt in its urban sprawl. But this time it was different: the source of the unrest echoed the sounds of virtual revolutions around the globe — inequality, incomprehension, inefficacy — yet like the people on the streets of Tehran and Cairo, the Londoners who chose to riot also chose to leave an incredibly rich trail of information in their wakes. By using social media to organize


Serendipity, aka “Accidental Discovery”: Does the Web Help or Hurt?

Monday, October 17, 2011

female students working on classroom computer together I am obsessed with serendipity. It’s become an almost pathological fascination since 2009, when I was inspired by a happy confluence of what I was doing then, and something that bumped up against it. I’m curious about what serendipity is, how it can be predicted and the things that help facilitate it and hinder it. And, being a student of the social psychology of the web, I’m interested in how the digital space affects it. Serendipity has become a topic of debate for web scholars and web developers. Author Stephen Johnson has declared the web the