Zeynep Tufekci

Zeynep Tufekci headshot

Zeynep Tufekci studies the interaction between technology and society. She is an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, a fellow at Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton and a faculty associate at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Her research interests revolve around social media, especially with regards to social movements, politics, surveillance and privacy. She blogs at http://www.technosociology.org and can be found on twitter at https://www.twitter.com/zeynep.


Blogs (5)


Capabilities of Movements and Affordances of Digital Media: Paradoxes of Empowerment

Thursday, January 09, 2014

man holding up hands fingers in heart shape in front of federal building From the “Indignados” in Spain, to “Occupy” in the United States, from Tahrir Square in Egypt to Syntagma Square in Greece, from Gezi Park in Turkey to #Euromaidan in Ukraine, the recent years have witnessed a proliferation of protests which, while embedded in differing circumstances and specific grievances, share multiple characteristics. Social media, an integral aspect of all these movements, is not a mere “tool” that is external to the organizational and cultural structure of these movements. Instead, it has become increasingly clear that communication is a form of organization, and the form of communication strongly


Pepper Spray and Penguins: Analysis of Turkey’s Social Media-fueled Gezi Protests

Thursday, October 03, 2013

protest sign in the air and hand holding iphone during turkey protest The Gezi protests took everyone, including the protesters themselves, by surprise. “This wasn’t what I had planned to do in June at all,” said a man in his early 30s to me as we sat in the small grassy area in front of his tent where he had been staying for more than a week. His wife nodded as she fiddled with her smartphone. I asked her what she was looking at. “Twitter,” she said, “I’m just getting the hang of it.” The protesters in Gezi were also getting the hang of being tear-gassed – as


Anonymity, Internet Surveillance & Lessons from the Anthony Weiner Case

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

security camera on facebook sign As a scholar of privacy and surveillance as well as political activism in repressive societies where government surveillance has consequences much worse than embarrassment and political derailment, my take away lesson from ex-congressman and current NYC mayoral hopeful Anthony Weiner’s second-time around exposure for online dalliances is this: there is no easy technical workaround out-of the current crisis of digital surveillance. After NSA whistle-blower Edward Snowden’s allegations made it painfully clear that the world’s intelligence agencies, including our own NSA, were scooping up vast amounts of data with the help of tech giants like Microsoft, Google


Be Quiet and Don’t Move So You Can Be Heard

Thursday, June 20, 2013

protesters standing outside building in turkey with turkey flag Last Saturday, one day after I left Istanbul following an intense week of interviews with more than 100 Gezi Park protest participants, Turkish police forcefully cleared out the park, which had been occupied by protesters for the last three weeks trying to halt the construction of a replica Ottoman Barracks and a shopping mall in Taksim Square’s only park. It was a sad, violent end to a joyful, eventful occupation that had a Woodstock meets Paris Commune vibe, where drum circles got interrupted by tear gas volleys, and diverse groups ranging from soccer fans to anti-capitalist


Networked Politics from Tahrir to Taksim: Is there a Social Media-fueled Protest Style?

Monday, June 03, 2013

man standing holding peace signs in city in front of thousands of protesters Protesters from one of the world’s richest countries, one of the world’s oldest autocracies, and one of the world’s rising developing countries walk into … a public space, use Twitter extensively, and capture global attention to their movement and their hashtag. From “#Occupy Wall Street” in the United States to the #M15 movement in Spain, from Tahrir Square and #Jan 25 in Egypt, to Taksim Square and #occupygezi in Turkey, there have been a variety of social movements that, while coming from strikingly different backgrounds and contexts, also share structural and stylistic elements. In this post,