eBooks

Writing for Interaction, Part 2

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 Comment 9 photos of someone using interacting with touchscreen

Media and literary theorists have argued for some time that reading is an inherently interactive process. To give only one example, the history of reading is mostly a history of bodily performance: reading to an audience or group, or reading out loud to oneself. It was only in the Middle Ages that reading silently to oneself became an accepted norm in the west. Since that time, reading out loud has continued to be a popular practice, and much writing, like poetry, is specifically designed to take advantage of this form of interaction. This can be seen


Writing for Interaction

Monday, March 18, 2013 Comment 2 peoples shadows projected on wall surrounded by words

We are all quite familiar with interactive writing. Business writing is a nearly constant stream of emails and memos that reply to and reference other texts. Teachers and students engage in a dialectic of writing, response, and revision, using tools from electronic texts to margin scribbles. The Internet is built on the back of blogs and comment threads and message boards, while everyone from teenagers to the Pope send texts and tweets. If we expand our understanding of writing to include not just words on paper or a screen but also verbal communication practices like leaving


eBooks Want to Be Free

Friday, January 18, 2013 Comment hand holding amazon kindle showing book cover of I drink your bookshelf

In my last post, I argued that an alternative to the Web 2.0 vision of the Internet—one where individuals “create value” for the corporations that run online networks—are the decentralized networks of the Occupy movement. Perhaps the clearest outline of the Web 2.0 philosophy applied to the Web is in Zittrain’s The Future of the Internet: And How to Stop It, in which he describes how the trend of Web development has been to limit the Internet’s traditional openness, that of any device being connected to the network and the ability to transfer any type of


eBooks, Writing, and Ownership

Thursday, February 09, 2012 Comment hands typing rapidly on laptop keyboard

One of the great promises of the internet is that it allows for writing to be distributed outside of the restrictions imposed by traditional publications. On the internet there is no scarcity of resources, no oversight by editors, and no need to tap a pre-identified audience, and these features of web publishing have made it possible for anyone with access to post nearly anything to be read by potentially anyone else. However, while the gains for writers have been very real, there remains a distinct hierarchy between the products of the traditional publishing industry and web-based


Bryan Alexander: Emerging Learning Technologies

Tuesday, February 07, 2012 Comment mystery and digital story inphographic northern voice 2010 by Bryan Alexander

I knew Bryan Alexander was intense when I first spotted him in the audience at a talk I gave in the late 1990s. Just look at him. Old Testament prophet? Civil War general? Straight out of Middle Earth or Hogwarts? It’s not just the beard and the eyes. When you watch my video interview with Bryan (below), you can’t help but notice he is always in motion. I’ve actually seen him pound the podium. He’s an educator and an educator of educators who can’t disguise his passion and doesn’t care if he stands out in the