Writing for Interaction, Part 2

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 Comment 9 photos of someone using interacting with touchscreen

Media and literary theorists have argued for some time that reading is an inherently interactive process. To give only one example, the history of reading is mostly a history of bodily performance: reading to an audience or group, or reading out loud to oneself. It was only in the Middle Ages that reading silently to oneself became an accepted norm in the west. Since that time, reading out loud has continued to be a popular practice, and much writing, like poetry, is specifically designed to take advantage of this form of interaction. This can be seen

Reflecting on Dharun Ravi’s Conviction

Monday, March 19, 2012 Comment artistic black and white photo of man looking through shades blinds

On Friday, Dharun Ravi — the Rutgers student whose roommate Tyler Clementi killed himself in a case narrated through the lens of cyberbullying — was found guilty of privacy invasion, tampering with evidence, and bias intimidation (a hate crime).  When John Palfrey and I wrote about this case three weeks ago, I was really hopeful that the court proceedings would give clarity and relieve my uncertainty.  Instead, I am left more conflicted and deeply saddened.  I believe the jury did their job, but I am not convinced that justice was served.  More disturbingly, I think the

Stop the Cycle of Bullying

Friday, February 24, 2012 Comment black and white photograph of man looking through window blinds

On 22 September 2010, the wallet of Tyler Clementi – a gay freshman at Rutgers University – was found on the George Washington Bridge; his body was found in the Hudson River the following week.  His roommate, Dharun Ravi, was charged with 15 criminal counts, including invasion of privacy, bias intimidation, and tampering with witnesses and evidence tampering.  Ravi pleaded not guilty. Ravi’s trial officially begins this week, but in the court of public opinion, he has already been convicted.  This is a terrible irony, since the case itself is about bullying. Wading through the news reports, it’s

Internet Research & Ethics: The Case of the London Riots Analysis

Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Comment lego pieces characters sitting at lego computers one being arrested by police

In the summer of 2011, London erupted in flames. Now, it’s not the first time the city has burned; it’s had a rich history of conflagration within its walls and revolt in its urban sprawl. But this time it was different: the source of the unrest echoed the sounds of virtual revolutions around the globe — inequality, incomprehension, inefficacy — yet like the people on the streets of Tehran and Cairo, the Londoners who chose to riot also chose to leave an incredibly rich trail of information in their wakes. By using social media to organize