Higher Education

Online Literacy and the College Learner: Transfer Research and Technology

Monday, February 01, 2016 Comment Students sitting in front of rows of computers facing projector screen

Recently, I wrote a post for DML Central about an online course that’s receiving unusually high course evaluations and is being offered by the Culture, Art, and Technology program at UC San Diego. It’s a course in which online literacy is both the form and the content of the assigned curriculum. The instructor, Alexandra Sartor, took time out from teaching for an interview with DML Central to talk about her experiences, teaching the course. She laughed about the fact that her ultimate achievement was probably having “almost no comments about the form of the course.” Despite the digital focus


Advancing New Forms of Scholarship in Writing

Monday, July 27, 2015 Comment screen shot of animated woman pirate fighter in game

I continue to think a great deal about how new media has grown the possibilities of our collective academic work. As the director of a Masters in Writing Studies Program at Kean University, I often reckon with how our traditional forms of scholarship are merely one reference point when considering how to produce and create new knowledge. As a result, I have for some time been a proponent of a more expansive sense of what writing might entail in the 21st century, and I have often spoken about “Writing-as-Making.” The digitized and computational environments of our


Speculative Design for Emergent Learning: Taking Risks

Thursday, June 11, 2015 Comment graphic of word Idea with stick figure characters drawing letters

As I look in the rear view mirror at this past semester, I marvel at the grand experiment of my #WritingRace class at Kean University that I blogged about as we embarked on our journey. I decided to take co-learning one step further. When I first met my fantastic group of graduate and undergraduate students for this course, I announced that they were in charge of their own learning outcomes. I also mentioned that there was no prescribed syllabus for the course.  Rather, they would design their own syllabus as they considered their collective goals. Along with


Taking a Leap of Faith

Thursday, February 05, 2015 Comment silhouette of man leaping in the air in front of city and sunset in background

In my previous DML blog, “Striving for New Ways to Learn How to Learn,” I wrote about co-learning as the heart of the connected learning experience. We have heard quite a bit about the limits of the “sage on the stage” approach and the dawning of new affordances in teaching with the “guide on the side” model. It goes without saying that a changing relationship to authority and hierarchy in the classroom is no small feat. It can certainly induce anxiety for all involved — the teacher must relinquish familiar control, the student must claim learning


Striving for New Ways to Learn How to Learn

Thursday, December 04, 2014 Comment mia zamora quote co-learning heart of connected learning

Much hope, promise, and cash has been invested in technology for the classroom, yet this hype has often set the stage for nothing more than technologically-powered traditional content delivery paradigms masquerading as innovation. The course of magical thinking that continues to celebrate “ed tech” often ends up replicating the same systemic problems that existed before the advent of new tools. Can technology serve as a transformative force for equity and justice? Many of us in the classroom know well that technology is by no means a quick fix for the shortcomings of education today. I have


Educating Educators: Q&A With Connected Learning Advocate Kira Baker-Doyle

Thursday, November 27, 2014 Comment kira baker boyle teaching 2 students in classroom

Kira J. Baker-Doyle, assistant professor of education at Arcadia University, and her colleagues designed Arcadia’s Connected Learning Certificate program so educators of all levels, from Kindergarten through graduate school, could build a network and teach and learn from each other. The program launched this fall and it’s driven by students who propose and select the content and topics of discussion. “The program embodies connected learning,” Baker-Doyle said. Connected learning is an educational approach designed for our ever-changing world. It leverages the advances of the digital age to make that dream a reality — connecting academics to


The Case for Open Courses in Higher Ed: Q&A with Connected Learning Educator Kim Jaxon

Thursday, September 18, 2014 Comment kim jaxon teaching at desk to adult students in classroom

Kim Jaxon is interested in having her students “do the thing,” which, she says, means that she’s less interested in preparing them for some later occupation or activity, and more excited about having them “participating right now in ideas that matter to them right now.” The Chico State assistant professor of English is one of a stellar group of open-learning pioneers who I met when they gathered at UC Irvine over the summer to create “Connected Courses,” a free online course for higher education faculty members to learn how to offer their own open online college


Phonar: A Massive, Free, Open Photography Class

Thursday, January 23, 2014 Comment phonar class students working on photo project on computers

When asked to explain his attitude toward arts education, British photographer Jonathan Worth describes what he is teaching as “storytelling” that should be an integral part of everyone’s “digital literacy and digital citizenship” rather than a rarified artistic skill for niche training of a cadre of aesthetic elites.  Worth is currently the instructor of Phonar, the sprawling massive, free, and open undergraduate photography course that he teaches to as many as 30,000 participants at one time. Worth’s initiative was one of five recognized recently for outstanding innovation in the international Reclaim Open Learning Challenge and Symposium. 


The Crisis in the Humanities and STEM – and Why We Must Recreate Higher Education

Monday, November 25, 2013 Comment packed college lecture hall of students with laptops

Here’s the punchline: The humanities in the U.S. are in crisis for the same reason that STEM is in crisis – not because of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics).  And vice versa.  The crisis comes from declining or at least stagnant numbers of students in these areas.  Faculty members are panicking and making snide, demeaning, and sometimes insulting comments about one another instead of coming to terms with the basic issue of why students today aren’t flocking to these subject areas.  To my mind, therein lies one of academe’s biggest problems.  We’re better at defensively placing


Reclaim Open Learning Symposium Keynote: “Let the Learning Drive the Technology”

Friday, September 27, 2013 Comment pink index card writing how can we help learners build global learning community

Editor’s note: This is a timely curation and storification of the opening session of Reclaim Open Learning by guest blogger Luka Carfagna that we wanted to share (Image credit: Andrew Forgrave, Flickr) [<a href=”//storify.com/LBCarfagna/reclaim-open-learning-symposium-keynote” target=”_blank”>View the story “Reclaim Open Learning Symposium Keynote” on Storify</a>]