New Media Literacies

Very Worthy Reads

Thursday, April 05, 2012 Comment man filming students working on ipads

In a new report from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, “Youth and Digital Media: From Credibility to Information Quality,” the authors set out to “map and explore what we know about the ways in which young users of age 18 and under search for information online, how they evaluate information, and how their related practices of content creation, levels of new literacies, general digital media usage, and social patterns affect these activities.” Their key findings: 1. Search shapes the quality of information that youth experience online.2. Youth use cues and heuristics


Webinar: How Can We Disrupt the “Banking” System of Education?

Thursday, March 29, 2012 Comment
bracelet love thy library Gale cendade learning

Earlier today, connectedlearning.tv hosted a live webinar with librarian Buffy Hamilton, aka “The Unquiet Librarian,” on the topic: How do libraries cultivate participatory literacy to disrupt what Paulo Freire calls the “banking” system of education? For this webinar series, anyone can be a part of the conversation via Livestream (http://livestream.com/connectedlearningtv) and Twitter (#connectedlearning), pose questions in real-time to the guest speaker, and connect with others in the emerging connected learning community. The webinar’s page on connectedlearning.tv now has a video recording as well as a growing list of the questions asked and resources mentioned. Joining Buffy


Distributed Writing: From Bad to Brilliant

Monday, March 12, 2012 Comment books pamphlets hanging from strings on the ceiling

In the report “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture” the authors argue that distributed cognition is a key skill that citizens must master to be active in participatory culture. Of course, most writing depends on some form of participation; show me a great writer, and you will likely find that there is a great editor, and quite likely a group of interested readers, providing feedback and support for him or her. While I could quibble that distributed cognition is a thing that happens, rather than a skill to be developed, I think this report is notable


DIY Coding

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Comment shadow of presenter on stage

Like many in the digital media and learning community, I am a fan of the free and open source computer programming language, Processing, which can be easily downloaded at Processing.org.  Processing is an incredibly accessible computer language for beginners, but it is also a stepping stone to widely used professional programming languages like Java and C++ that may contribute to success in corporate and academic arenas for those who are code literate. There is a large do-it-yourself community made up of individuals who use Processing for everything from robotics to art projects to sequencing neighborhood Christmas


Brazil: Kids Using Digital Media to Teach Each Other, Change Culture

Monday, February 13, 2012 Comment Internet Uvre students working in computer lab

Last year, Rio de Janeiro saw the birth of a new type of battle in the streets of the favelas: the “Small Step Battle.” In this battle, hundreds of kids and teenagers from the poor parts of Rio are fighting with a major weapon: dance steps. Everyday, kids are posting videos of themselves performing creative and often very difficult ‘funk’ dance steps on YouTube. These videos are now a fever: some have millions of viewers. The battle is on and these kids are challenging others to create better (and often, even more difficult steps) to dance


What Schools are Really Blocking When They Block Social Media

Monday, January 30, 2012 Comment 1 female student sitting alone in empty classroom

The debates about schools and social media are a subject of great public and policy interests.  In reality, the debate has been shaped by one key fact: the almost universal decision by school administrators to block social media.  Because social media is such a big part of many students social lives, cultural identities, and informal learning networks schools actually find themselves grappling with social media everyday but often from a defensive posture—reacting to student disputes that play out over social media or policing rather than engaging student’s social media behaviors. Education administrators block social media because


Why We Need a 4th R: Reading, wRiting, aRithmetic, algoRithms

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 Comment 2 young girls sitting in grass woods outside reading school books

When Frederick J. Kelly invented the Kansas Silent Reading Test, now known as the “multiple-choice test” or the “bubble test,” he was looking for an efficient way to pass students through the U.S. public education system during the teacher shortage of 1914.  With the advent of World War I, men were off to the frontlines in Europe, women were working in war-time factories, and there was a population boom of new immigrants flooding into the schools.  Taking his inspiration from Henry Ford’s assembly line, Kelly came up with a way to standardize learning and assessment for


Teaching Art in a Connected World: the Possibilities

Friday, January 20, 2012 Comment 3 girls covered in paint working on art projects in art class

Aaron Knochel is an assistant professor at SUNY New Paltz, teaching upper division courses in curriculum theory and practice and “technology in the art classroom” in the university’s Art Education program. This past August, Knochel received his PhD in Art Education at Ohio State University, where his research focused on the possibilities and opportunities that new media and technology provide to art education. He was also one of twelve scholars to take part in the DML Research Hub’s Research Associates Summer Institute 2011. As an artist and an educator, Knochel believes that visual skills and digital


Social Reading and the Foundations of Digital Literacy

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 Comment 4 little boys sitting on classroom floor all working on ipad with headphones

Not long ago, I was on an airplane waiting for takeoff. Due to the completely reasonable FAA restrictions on using electronic devices, I was reading the print version of a magazine while we waited to taxi to the runway. I soon found I was absorbed in the content of the article, and, when a passage caught my eye, I reflexively tapped the page with my index finger in an attempt to highlight the passage, just as I would have done when reading on my tablet computer. Of course, I quickly realized that print does not work that


Are they Students or are they Innovators?

Sunday, January 01, 2012 Comment row of students sitting at classroom desks focusing on teacher

Lisa Schwartz is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Colorado, Boulder, working with Dr. Kris Gutierrez and a research team on the Connected Learning Research Network (CLRN). She recently completed her dissertation, “Forming a Collaborative Model for Appropriating Youth and Digital Practices for New Literacies Development with Teachers and Latino Students,” at the University of Arizona in the Department of Language, Reading & Culture. Her dissertation documents ethnographic research involving high school English teachers and predomi nantly Latino students who they were asked to work together to develop new ways to approach schooling and