Participatory Culture

Designing Youth Participatory Action Research Pathways: Bringing YPAR to DML

Monday, April 04, 2016 Comment graphic design for DML Geekout Day workshop, Designing Youth Participatory Action Research Pathways

Sometimes when you are immersed in a community and surrounded by friends with like-minded interests, beliefs, and ideas, you begin to forget that an entire world that does not understand your lingo or share your experiences exists outside that community. I re-learn this lesson often in the context of the Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) community. I feel so fortunate to have been invited to share my YPAR experiences across multiple audiences over the past few weeks. I participated in an Educator Innovator webinar alongside several members of the UCLA Council of Youth Research to discuss

What the Connected Learning Research Community Can Learn from YPAR

Monday, December 21, 2015 Comment man speaking on stage at Council of Youth Research

Last month, the two of us (along with our mentor, Dr. Ernest Morrell) celebrated the release of our book, Doing Youth Participatory Action Research: Transforming Inquiry with Researchers, Educators, and Youth. The book tells the story of the UCLA Council of Youth Research (YPAR), a long-running youth participatory action research program that mentors young people from South and East Los Angeles to develop research questions about the educational and social challenges they recognize in their communities and then conduct rigorous inquiry into those questions for the purposes of fostering empowerment and action for social justice. We

Creating Cyber Connections

Thursday, December 10, 2015 Comment cluster of clipped multi colored wires

We have been reflecting lately on the significance of our network in helping us learn and grow as scholars, as teachers, and as co-learners. Often, people associate the term network with the infrastructure of computer systems. But, what has this important term come to mean for learning in the context of digital pedagogy and the social web? Who do we connect with and how do we share on the web? How do networks facilitate and expand the scope of our own learning? We have met and worked with many new colleagues from around the globe, thanks

Henry Jenkins on Participatory Media in a Networked Era, Part 2

Monday, November 09, 2015 Comment Participatory culture in a networked era Henry Jenkins mimi ito danah boyd book cover

This is the second installment of a two-part interview with Henry Jenkins, co-author with Mizuko Ito and danah boyd of the brilliant new book, “Participatory Culture in a Networked Era.” In the first part, we talked about defining participatory culture; youth culture, youth practices; gaps and genres in participation. In this second part, we talk about learning and literacy; commercial culture; democracy, civic engagement, and activism; and reimagining participatory culture. Although Professor Jenkins articulates the main themes of the book clearly in our video conversation, I should emphasize that this book is a conversation among the

All About That Badge

Monday, October 27, 2014 Comment 5 badges illustration triangles representing hands school magnifying glass space computers

I often hear people say, “It’s not about the badge. It’s about the learning.” Well, yes. It is always good to bring the focus back to what we value. But, what if it really is about the badge? What if, by insisting on the learning, we miss something even more social, more fundamental than what is being learned. Before I get booed off the stage for saying this, let me explain. In 2013, each of the 30 Badges for Lifelong Learning projects responded to a series of questions about their first year of badge system design.

Fanfiction, Capitalism and Draco in Leather Pants

Monday, December 16, 2013 Comment harry potter book collection on display

Earlier in the semester, I found myself lecturing to a class and having students in my Young Adult Literature course take notes about “Draco in Leather Pants.” Stay with me. Along with contemporary books like Gossip Girl and classics like The Outsiders and Go Ask Alice, my undergraduates at Colorado State University and I looked at how online environments in the past decade have transformed the world of teen literature. For readers of this blog, such a focus shouldn’t be very surprising. Discussions of the Harry Potter Alliance and John Green’s legions of nerdfighters highlight the

Expanding Women’s Participation for Wikipedia in India: Access to Knowledge

Thursday, October 31, 2013 Comment classroom full of students sitting at desks in india

In the past DMLcentral has covered efforts to recruit more women to edit Wikipedia and to produce more women’s studies content.  As a blogger, I have presented this story as a relatively uncontroversial initiative to improve the accuracy and coverage of the sprawling online encyclopedia (See my interview with Wikipedia’s Adrianne Wadewitz here).  Working with the Project Feminism Wikipedia community to produce digital material, students trained in classes involved in Dialogues on Feminism and Technology have worked to improve the rigor of Wikipedia entries on topics that range from Afrofuturism to disability art. Recently, Fox News

Human Rights and Social Media in India: Blank Noise

Monday, October 21, 2013 Comment group of teenagers leaning against outside fence in india

On a recent visit to Sarai, a Delhi research think tank housed in the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, I met a number of female university students who described participating in the mass protests that occurred after a 23-year-old physiotherapy student was raped and murdered in what many perceived as an event that unleashed a torrent of dissent to express longstanding dissatisfaction about lax policing and prosecution of crimes against women in India.  Participants recounted assaults at demonstrations that included braving tear gas, water cannons, and violent interruptions by police of the peaceful sharing

How to Use Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool: Adrianne Wadewitz

Monday, May 06, 2013 Comment 4 female students sitting in classroom working on laptops very focused

Wikipedia is often not thought of as a platform for pedagogy, since so many teachers explicitly tell their students to steer clear of the site as a source of information.  However, as a site for learner-driven inquiry and informal education, it is without question the chief reference point for many discussions from matters of general knowledge to areas of arcane expertise. Adrianne Wadewitz would like to provide more explicit instruction about not only reading Wikipedia but also writing Wikipedia in the classroom context.  She has helped write a helpful brochure from the Wikimedia Foundation on “How

What Comes After Election Monitoring? Citizen Monitoring of Infrastructure

Monday, April 29, 2013 Comment black man speaking into bull horn at rally

I was recently in Senegal at a board meeting for Open Society Foundation, meeting organizations the foundation supports around the continent. Two projects in particular stuck in my mind. One is Y’en a Marre (“Fed Up”), a Senegalese activist organization led by hiphop artists and journalists, who worked to register voters and oust long-time president Abdoulaye Wade. (I wrote about them last week here, and on Wikipedia). The other is a project run by Open Society Foundation West Africa – OSIWA – with support from partners in Senegal, Liberia, Nigeria and the UK. It’s an election