Web Culture

Reassessing Collective Intelligence

Thursday, April 07, 2016 Comment Donald Trump's campaign manager grabbing reporter's arm

“@MichelleFields you are totally delusional”: Collective intelligence in 2016 Back in 2005, Tim O’Reilly, publisher and technology pundit, posted an essay describing “Web 2.0.” In it, O’Reilly attempted to describe what had changed about the internet since the early 2000 tech bubble and what had become called “Web 1.0,” the first generation of the  business-oriented, public web. One of the changes of Web 2.0 that O’Reilly identified was “harnessing collective intelligence,” using the group features of the web to develop new smart products. One effect of this collective intelligence, “turning the web into a global brain”

Learning Pathways: Descriptive or Prescriptive?

Thursday, January 29, 2015 Comment animation of black blots blobs connected by intricate web of lines pathways

A few months ago, in a post entitled Scaffolding Web Literacy Through Learning Pathways, I differentiated between training pathways (“a series of steps that lead to the individual being able to reproduce knowledge or action”) and learning pathways (“experiences lead[ing] to the re-shaping of… future behaviour”). Descriptive/Prescriptive In this post, I want to dive deeper into learning pathways, dividing these types of pathways into broadly two groups. There are those kinds of pathways that are descriptive and those that are prescriptive. Neither of these labels is pejorative, as each could be appropriate given a particular context. This way of looking at learning

Reflexivity: Why We Must Choose to Shape, and Not Be Shaped By, Technology

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 Comment women sitting in the dark working on laptop

In her new book, Consent of the Networked, Rebecca Mackinnon offers a reality check: “We have a problem,” she writes. “We understand how power works in the physical world, but we do not yet have a clear understanding of how power works in the digital realm.” In fact, we probably don’t even think about power when we update our statuses on Twitter, connect with old school friends and upload pictures on Facebook, buy a book based on a recommendation from Amazon or use Mail, Docs, Plus, Maps or search on Google. Software — from computer games