Connected Learning

Nicole Mira Profile Picture
By Nicole Mirra June 22, 2015 - 12:00am Comments
I always cringe when educational pundits talk about evaluating teachers according to “value-added” assessment models, as if the value that teachers offer their students could be easily quantified or evaluated according to any standardized metric.
Antero Garcia Profile Picture
By Antero Garcia June 18, 2015 - 12:00am Comments
In his concluding remarks during his DML 2015 session, “Designing Classroom Equity: Connected Learning and Co-Designed Research from Across the National Writing Project,” DML Conference Committee member and Columbia University Professor Ernest Morrell noted: “Technologies are tools; love is a foundation; humanity is the end.” 
Howard Rheingold  Profile Picture
By Howard Rheingold June 15, 2015 - 7:13am Comments
Young faculty who came of age at the same time that social media emerged are beginning to experiment with new containers for old curricular vintages such as English composition. Michael Stewart, lecturer in English at Brown University, is rethinking traditional forms more radically than simply recasting traditional literature in digital media formats: “What happens when we take the form of a dictionary and use it for other, hopefully nefarious purposes?
Mia C. Zamora Profile Picture
By Mia C. Zamora June 11, 2015 - 5:21am Comments
As I look in the rear view mirror at this past semester, I marvel at the grand experiment of my #WritingRace class at Kean University that I blogged about as we embarked on our journey. I decided to take co-learning one step further.
Doug Belshaw Profile Picture
By Doug Belshaw May 28, 2015 - 10:22am Comments
At the beginning of this month, the Badge Alliance published version 1.1 of the Open Badges specification. This is a technical reference for developers. However, it has exciting, far-reaching pedagogical and social possibilities that are worth highlighting. In this post, I want to explore just a couple of these: mapping and endorsement.
S. Craig Watkins Profile Picture
By S. Craig Watkins May 25, 2015 - 8:43am Comments
As educators, policy makers and community activists look to build more equitable futures, a considerable amount of attention remains focused on families, especially parents. Families represent an important node in the learning ecologies of children and teens. When parents are able to connect their children to resources, material and immaterial, they provide substantive support in the pursuit of academic (i.e., higher grades) and non-academic (i.e., character building) outcomes.
Antero Garcia Profile Picture
By Antero Garcia May 14, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
I want to complain for a minute about a certain Hollywood superhero blockbuster. Then, I want to complain for a minute about people who complain about superhero blockbusters on the Internet. Hypocrite? Probably.
Howard Rheingold  Profile Picture
By Howard Rheingold May 11, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
So many online courses concentrate on hard sciences and practical skills. How about the humanities? Laura Gibbs, who teaches two purely online courses for the University of Oklahoma, most certainly qualifies as a humanities enthusiast: Dr.
Ben Williamson  Profile Picture
By Ben Williamson April 30, 2015 - 8:47am Comments
In the UK, the last year or so has seen a massive proliferation of interest in digital education right across the spectrum of the public, private and civil society sectors. Digital education has now become the focus for a cross-sector “network” of interests and concerns, and, as a result, is now becoming “governmentalized” as a seriously political business.
Howard Rheingold  Profile Picture
By Howard Rheingold April 13, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
“I learned more on Twitter in six months than in two years of graduate school” is the epigraph of the first chapter of Tom Whitby’s book (co-authored with Steven W.
Nicole Mira Profile Picture
By Nicole Mirra April 9, 2015 - 9:59am Comments
As part of the national celebration of Digital Learning Day last month, I had the opportunity to moderate an online debate between two teams of high school students from opposite ends of California about the merits and risks of social media as a communication tool. Considering that I helped coach a high school policy debate team in my former life, I was thrilled to participate in this lively dialogue.
Mimi Ko Cruz Profile Picture
By Mimi Ko Cruz April 6, 2015 - 10:04pm Comments
Rafi Santo and Dixie Ching are figuring out how youth programs in New York can best support young people in learning whatever interests them.
Buffy J. Hamilton Profile Picture
By Buffy J. Hamilton March 23, 2015 - 10:44am Comments
As we continue our efforts to think about writing literacies as a focal point of our inquiry work in a high school library, my colleague Jennifer Lund and I continue to see the power of an old school technology: pen and paper.
Liz Losh  Profile Picture
By Liz Losh March 12, 2015 - 9:51am Comments
Editor's note: This is the second in a three-part series highlighting different programs that teach digital literacy outside of school.
Howard Rheingold  Profile Picture
By Howard Rheingold March 2, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
KitHub, “creative electronics for young innovators,” is a kit-of-the-month club for young makers, their parents, and their families. It was designed to empower kids and parents who weren’t necessarily close to a physical makerspace, by two women — Tara Tiger Brown and Luz Rivas — who are passionately devoted to maker education, not by an edu-biz conglomerate or VC-founded startup.
Mimi Ko Cruz Profile Picture
By Mimi Ko Cruz February 26, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
“Disability is central to the human experience,” writes Meryl Alper in the opening chapter of her book, “Digital Youth with Disabilities.” The report summarizes how children with disabilities use media for social and recreational purposes and identifies areas where more research on the topic is needed.  
Advancing Access for Digital Youth with Disabilities Blog Image
Ben Williamson  Profile Picture
By Ben Williamson February 23, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
The rapid growth of learning to code clubs, makerspaces, hackerspaces and even makercities has been remarkable. It’s fairly logical, then, that the focus for various coders, makers and hackers has switched back around to focus on education and learning itself. We’ve learned to code, hack and make new stuff, why not code, hack and make a new kind of education? Neo-unschooling
Hackerspaces and Homeschooling: Making ‘Startup Schools’ Blog Image
Jade E. Davis Profile Picture
By Jade E. Davis February 19, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
The family computer recently stopped working. This wouldn’t be the end of the world normally, however, my oldest son’s second-grade classroom implemented a new homework policy. Instead of having homework on paper, all homework is done on the computer across three sites.
The Computer Ate My Homework Blog Image
Howard Rheingold  Profile Picture
By Howard Rheingold February 16, 2015 - 8:00am Comments
What if we trusted students as a default and dealt with transgressions when and if they come up? What if we gave them web-accessible devices without filters but taught them common sense and used transgressions as teachable moments? What if we even gave learners of every age a bit of agency in the shaping of their own curriculum — above and beyond recess and show-and-tell?
‘Our Common Core’ Blog Image
Nicole Mira Profile Picture
By Nicole Mirra February 12, 2015 - 9:45am Comments
The title of the article from The Atlantic stopped me in my tracks as I was scrolling through my Twitter feed: “Why I am Not a Maker.” 
Is the Maker Movement Equitable?  Blog Image

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