Kim Jaxon

Kim Jaxon

Kim Jaxon is an associate professor of English (Composition & Literacy). She received her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in the Language & Literacy, Society & Culture program in the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on theories of literacy, particularly digital literacies, participation, classroom design, game theories, and teacher education. She has published a variety of book chapters and articles focused on classroom design, mentoring, and the uses of digital platforms. Kim was awarded the Teacher of Excellence-College Award by the California Association of Teachers of English in 2014. She recently co-authored the book Composing Science: A Facilitator’s Guide to Writing in the Science Classroom (TCPress 2016), which is the culmination of a three-year, NSF funded project focused on the teaching and learning of writing in science. Kim Jaxon Website


Blogs (4)


Building Community With Peer Mentors

Monday, June 05, 2017

mentors “The more I give my teacher-power to students and encourage them to take more responsibility for their own learning, the more they show me how to redesign my ways of teaching.” — Howard Rheingold, “Toward Peeragogy” Howard Rheingold has been a champion of peer-to-peer learning for years. Howard’s ideas are often in my head, milling about with Lev Vygotsky and social theories of learning. When I set out to design a large writing course for college freshmen, I was particularly focused on the role more capable peers would play in our writing class. In fact, I


Rescuing Student Participation Through Digital Platforms

Thursday, April 20, 2017

two students in fox masks Like many of my colleagues who think carefully about digital literacy and pedagogies, I began seriously considering the use of social media platforms in educational settings — sites like Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr — around 2008. Despite nearly a decade of innovative uses of digital platforms in educational settings, the use of these platforms and spaces continues to be trivialized by the public and teachers alike, with cries echoing about attention spans and nostalgia for the loss of face-to-face interaction, which seem more “real.” But, to continue to dismiss digital platforms, particularly those focused on social


Making Science: When Does Spaghetti Become a Light Ray?

Monday, March 20, 2017

spaghetti artifact For the past few years, we have been fortunate to work together in a scientific inquiry class. Bringing together science faculty and composition faculty makes for some lively conversations about the teaching of writing. The course is offered to future elementary school teachers who are typically non-science majors. We recently co-wrote with Irene Salter Composing Science: A Facilitator’s Guide to Writing in the Science Classroom (TCPress 2016), which describes our work with these future teachers and our practices for teaching writing in science. The book lays out how we engage students in practices that mirror the


Epic Learning: Large Class as Intentional Design

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Jumbo class Last October, I gave an Ignite talk at the Digital Media and Learning Conference called “Epic Composition.” Below, I offer a more extended look at the design and structures of my “jumbo” first-year writing course at California State University, Chico. Walking into our “jumbo” first-year writing course as an outsider can be a bit intimidating. The room is packed with people: 90 students, nine writing mentors, and the instructor. Students sit in new desks: rolling chairs with a bottom “saucer” for storing backpacks, a moving tray designed for a laptop. Students have nicknamed the chairs “George