Digital Media

Diana Rhoten: The Science of Reimagining Learning

Monday, March 29, 2010 Comment little students excited throwing hats in the air

“From the standpoint of the child, the great waste in the school comes from his inability to utilize the experiences he gets outside the school in any complete and free way within the school itself; while, on the other hand, he is unable to apply in daily life what he is learning at school. That is the isolation of the school – its isolation from life. When the child gets into the schoolroom he has to put out of his mind a large part of the ideas, interests, and activities that predominate in his home and


Spin: The Digital Media & Learning Conference 2010

Thursday, March 11, 2010 Comment art piece of record player in snow outside

Hidden in the tweetstream from the Digital Media and Learning Conference 2010 are hundreds of provocative insights, comments, and observations, and we couldn’t help but mine the archive for another round. The full stream can be found here: #dml2010. The tweets we’ve collected below contain ideas, questions, and thoughts that can be readily absorbed by both those who attended the conference and those who did not – as well as recommended resources and links. Cast of Characters (in order of tweets that reference them):Katie Salen (presenter) Ernest Morrell (panelist) Henry Jenkins (conference chair) Benjamin Stokes (panelist)Lev


Reimagining Learning

Monday, March 08, 2010 Comment students sitting at desks working on computers

Teaching and education in America has been a very hot subject in the news. In recent days, there have been lengthy pieces on “building a better teacher,”  the ripple effects of a Rhode Island school board’s decision to fire the entire faculty of a poorly performing school and President Obama’s remarks, and the results of a large survey of teachers. So, I wanted to bring attention to a new effort coming out of the office of our friend, Jim Shelton, at the U.S. Department of Education. It’s a new web 2.0 site on Ed.gov called The


Dispatches: Digital Media & Learning Conference 2010

Thursday, February 25, 2010 Comment phone in the sand at beach

In the wake of the Digital Media and Learning Conference, we’re seeing many great conversations taking place and intriguing questions being asked. Here’s a second wave of tweets harvested from the conference tweetstream. As before, these are tweets containing insights, observations, comments, questions, takeaways, and resource referrals compelling both to those who were there, but also to those who were not. The full tweetsream can be found on Twitter at #dml2010. Cast of characters (in order of reference in tweets):danah boyd (presenter)David Theo Goldberg (moderator) Sonia Livingstone (keynote/closing)Jeremy Hunsinger (discussant)Tracy Fullerton (presenter) Alexander Halavais (presenter)S. Craig


Remix: Digital Media and Learning Conference 2010

Tuesday, February 23, 2010 Comment DML Conference 2010 Diversifying participation logo

More than 400 researchers, scholars, educators, practitioners, and youth experts from the emerging digital media and learning field have just returned from our first Digital Media and Learning Conference. We’re still trying to wrap our arms around the riveting conversation and probing questions that bubbled up at the conference, held at UC San Diego. Meantime, here’s an initial batch of raw tweets from the conference with insights, ideas, observations, comments, questions, takeaways, and resource referrals that might be compelling both to those who were there, but also to those who were not. By most accounts, it


Recommended reading, watching, listening

Monday, February 15, 2010 Comment group of global kids girls smiling holding up signs

Global Kids‘ New York City-based programs address the urgent need for young people to possess leadership skills and an understanding of complex global issues to succeed in the 21st century workplace and participate in the democratic process. The staff has a wonderful appetite for learning and we regularly provide DMLcentral.net a snapshot of resource picks we consider insightful and relevant. Please comment and tell us what you are reading and watching, too! Topping our current list: Feed by M.T. Anderson, a dystopic science fiction novel about a world where technology has become such a part of


eBooks and Learning

Thursday, January 21, 2010 Comment Stack of Psychology books

Now that the ebook industry has set its sights on the textbook and educational markets, it’s especially important for educators to shape discussion of the benefits and potential impact of ereaders. Rather than bemoan the loss of wood pulp and glue that make up current texts, we are better served by asking how these physical objects serve learning, and what is lost (or gained) by replacing them with electronic texts. One doesn’t have to abandon a love for print books to appreciate the unique affordances of new technologies. For example: how many would prefer poring through


Educating for the Future, Not the Past

Tuesday, January 19, 2010 Comment Einstein writing on chalk board quote

Historian Robert Darnton has argued that we are currently in the fourth great Information Age in all human history.  The first information revolution came with the development of writing in 4000 B.C. Mesopotamia.  The second was facilitated by the invention of movable type (in 10th Century China and 15th Century Europe).  The third was marked by the advent of mass printing (presses, cheap ink and paper, mass distribution systems, and mass literacy) in late 18th Century Europe and America. The current Information Age is the fourth such era, marked by the development of the Internet and,


An Emerging Theory: Things Rule

Thursday, January 14, 2010 Comment pictures of presentation trash technology

The international conference on Digital Arts and Culture is often a place for previewing coming theoretical trends in digital scholarship.  Long before the formation of separate conferences for the Electronic Literature Organization and the Digital Games Research Association, DAC was at the forefront of interactive literature and game studies.  This year’s DAC conference, “After Media: Embodiment and Context,” included a prominent “Interdisciplinary Pedagogy” theme led by digital artist Cynthia Beth Rubin that tried to make connections between the cutting-edge, sophisticated theory that the conference represented and the more mundane practical challenges posed by instructional technology and


Global Kids: Recommended Reading…Viewing…Listening

Tuesday, January 05, 2010 Comment 3 diverse global kids girls posing for photo

Global Kids’ New York City-based programs address the urgent need for young people to possess leadership skills and an understanding of complex global issues to succeed in the 21st century workplace and participate in the democratic process. Now in its ninth year, Global Kids’ Online Leadership Program (OLP) integrates a youth development approach and international and public policy issues into youth media programs that build digital literacy, foster substantive online dialogues, develop resources for educators, and promote civic participation. To keep the work connected to emerging research and practice, OLP staff feed their voracious appetite reading