Equity

Google Report Reveals State of K-12 Computer Science Education

Monday, May 28, 2018 Comment student at computer

Computer scientists still are in high demand in the U.S., people of color still are disproportionately underrepresented in the field and whether and how computer science (CS) is taught varies wildly, according to a new report on the state of Kindergarten-through-high school CS education. Authored by Paulo Blikstein, assistant professor of education and (by courtesy) computer science at Stanford, the report — Pre-College Computer Science Education: A Survey of the Field — was commissioned by Google to shine a light on where CS education stands today and where it needs to go. “CS education has the


Amplifying Student Voice Through Digital Resources, Part 2

Monday, May 21, 2018 Comment screenshot from student class assignment video

“Our stories that we tell are so powerful because when we are the one’s telling it, we have control over our stories and the messages that we are sending.” — Alejandra Ramirez Bermudez I am regularly in awe at the goodwill our students extend faculty, myself included, as they attempt to make sense of and successfully complete our idiosyncratic assignments. Too often, students hear faculty respond to any confusion students might have by telling them to “read the syllabus” or “read the assignment,” as if none of the faculty have ever tried to put together an


Amplifying Student Voice Through Digital Resources, Part 1

Monday, May 14, 2018 Comment Students in Kim Jaxon's English class on digital culture

As I shared in a previous post, I’ve spent this semester working with 84 incredible freshmen and 10 writing mentors, exploring digital culture and identities in our first-year writing course. We read blogs by Audrey Watters, watched films like “The Internet’s Own Boy,” we tracked and analyzed our digital selves, and were moved by the digital activism of people like Esra’a Al Shafei, Alicia Garza of #blacklivesmatter, and Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American. We used these resources, and other models of digital civic engagement, to inform our own research. A few weeks ago, students turned


From the Streets to the Archives, Part 3

Monday, May 07, 2018 Comment student on device

Editor’s note: This is the third part of a three-part post featuring the fourth interview in a multi-part series with participants in the Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Conference. The series features public intellectuals discussing digital literacy issues. Jessica Marie Johnson is one of the country’s leading scholars on black code literacy. I’ve had the privilege of teaching with her at the Digital Humanities Summer Research Institute. At the conference my campus organized, she recently gave this thought-provoking and inspiring keynote address. (See Part 1 and Part 2 of DML Central’s introduction to Professor Johnson.) Computing


Black Code Studies 101, Part 2

Monday, April 23, 2018 Comment coding

Editor’s note: This is the second part of a three-part post featuring the fourth interview in a multi-part series with participants in the Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Conference. The series features public intellectuals discussing digital literacy issues. Jessica Marie Johnson is one of the country’s leading scholars on black code literacy. I’ve had the privilege of teaching with her at the Digital Humanities Summer Research Institute. At the conference my campus organized, she recently gave this thought-provoking and inspiring keynote address. (See Part 1 of DML Central’s introduction to Professor Johnson.) With Mark Anthony


Rethinking Black Digital Literacy, Part 1

Monday, April 09, 2018 Comment IBM computer

Editor’s note: This is the first part of a three-part post featuring the fourth interview in a multi-part series with participants in the Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Conference. The series features public intellectuals discussing digital literacy issues. Jessica Marie Johnson is one of the country’s leading scholars on black code literacy. I’ve had the privilege of teaching with her at the Digital Humanities Summer Research Institute. At the conference my campus organized, she recently gave a thought-provoking and inspiring keynote address. Professor Johnson’s own digital literacy story started early: “I have what feels now like


Teaching Underrepresented Students How to Navigate Higher Ed Via Digital Humanities

Monday, February 05, 2018 Comment VR

This is the third part in a multi-part series about participants in the Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities conference. This series features public intellectuals discussing digital literacy issues. Professor Marisa Parham of Amherst College, who has led the Five College Digital Humanities initiative has a long history with digital media. “My earliest experiences with computers and devices mainly stemmed from my grandfather’s obsession with Kaypros in the 1980s. I was 8 or 9 years old. He would take me downtown to ogle what must have been some iteration of the Kaypro II, which for some reason,


Digitally Improving Historical Knowledge

Monday, December 25, 2017 Comment members of the Colored Conventions Project

This is the second part in a multi-part series about participants in the Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities conference. This series features public intellectuals discussing digital literacy issues. “Colored Conventions: Bringing Nineteenth-Century Black Organizing to Digital Life” was recently named by the National Endowment for the Humanities one of its “essentials” a collection of 50 works funded by the organization to reshape “what we know about ourselves and our world.” Like Ken Burns’ sprawling documentary on the Civil War or the preservation and publication of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the NEH lauded “Colored Conventions” for its ground-breaking


From Tech Engagement to Tech Scholars

Monday, December 11, 2017 Comment College of DuPage's 50th annual Commencement

One of the reasons I was very excited to join a community college is because there is a gap in how we think about bringing digital media and technology into learning. While there is a lot of research on K-12 and higher education in general, there isn’t as much research on students who are at risk of failing to continue their education at community colleges. These years are a unique opportunity when it is imperative that people in a position to do so work to close the various achievement gaps. The one people are most familiar


Frugal Innovation in Digital Learning

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 Comment dml

I’ve been doing a lot of reflecting on what makes a good and accessible digital assignment for faculty and teachers who are not comfortable with digital tools but open to learning and experimenting. An approach I’ve often seen is what I’ve recently started calling the kitchen sink approach to “onboarding.” In this approach, a suite of tools or a single tool that can do “everything you can imagine and more” is shown or given to a faculty member to integrate into their already existing course or assignment. The hesitant but eager faculty member, initially excited to